El ojo de Demian
Un mundo de libertad y maravilla visto con los ojos de mi niño interior
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Quiero uno así!!! He dicho!
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A flexible rapier made during the 19th century in Toledo, Spain.
via surechigai

A flexible rapier made during the 19th century in Toledo, Spain.
via surechigai

A flexible rapier made during the 19th century in Toledo, Spain.
via surechigai
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petrichoriousparalian:

tella1985:

artist-refs:

thepeoplesrepublicofheaven:

THANK YOU

I’m still confused ._.

Art Nouveau is flowing like nature. Art deco is rigid and looks more man made.

deco = geometric
nouveau = organic

petrichoriousparalian:

tella1985:

artist-refs:

thepeoplesrepublicofheaven:

THANK YOU

I’m still confused ._.

Art Nouveau is flowing like nature. Art deco is rigid and looks more man made.

deco = geometric
nouveau = organic

petrichoriousparalian:

tella1985:

artist-refs:

thepeoplesrepublicofheaven:

THANK YOU

I’m still confused ._.

Art Nouveau is flowing like nature. Art deco is rigid and looks more man made.

deco = geometric
nouveau = organic

petrichoriousparalian:

tella1985:

artist-refs:

thepeoplesrepublicofheaven:

THANK YOU

I’m still confused ._.

Art Nouveau is flowing like nature. Art deco is rigid and looks more man made.

deco = geometric
nouveau = organic
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Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

Beau Dickis
via Fazakas Gallery:
Beau Dickis one of the Northwest Coast’s most versatile and talented carvers. For more than three decades, he has actively perpetuated the ceremonial traditions of his people, the Kwakwaka’wakw. […]
A carver who takes much of his inspiration and technique from traditional Kwakwaka’wakw art, Beau’s work has been particularly noted for its embrace of contemporary influences, often incorporating European and Asian styles into his creations. His masks in particular have been lauded for their rough yet realistic presentation, representing a piece that is both austere yet incredibly life-like. As the artist himself has put it:
“My style is sometimes referred to as “Potlatch Style” as it comes from a tradition of ceremony which requires many masks to be made in a short period of time. It takes many years of practice and an understanding of balance in order to create a work that is appears finished in a natural and instinctive manner, without seeming overthought.” […]
Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.
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greenmetalalien:

~farang
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feiyueshoesshopstuff:

Often skip along like a kid on the school roof. His father was a soldier, he was inspired by his father , and then create a Parkour this movement..
Feiyue shoes will take you in the Kung Fu world.
http://www.icnbuys.com/tai-chi-t-shirts
Follow back!
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tehnakki:

nerdiosity:

superwolfavengewholock:

It’s a fucking Nick Furry cosplay cat.

I tried to scroll past it.

hahahahah. yes.
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Amo a estos bichos!
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illustrationsideration:

Alex Ries [site | tumblr | dA]
illustrationsideration:

Alex Ries [site | tumblr | dA]
illustrationsideration:

Alex Ries [site | tumblr | dA]
illustrationsideration:

Alex Ries [site | tumblr | dA]
illustrationsideration:

Alex Ries [site | tumblr | dA]
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deeeeaaan:



Game of Thrones Wedding Cake


oh yeah lets just have a game of thrones themed wedding
what can possibly go wrong?
deeeeaaan:



Game of Thrones Wedding Cake


oh yeah lets just have a game of thrones themed wedding
what can possibly go wrong?
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steampunkd:

A nice Steampunk octopus tattoo. Do you have any? Submit it!
Check out more Steampunk Tattoos on Steampunk’d
(via shu-sawada)
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alexriesart:

To see how I painted this creature, head over to Pheonix Atelier and sign up! I shall be instructing a class there from the 21st of October in creature design.
http://www.phoenixatelier.com/program/designing-alien-life#.UlQpdhB6pu4
The Kirrabilli 
The kirrabilli are a sentient hexapodal species about four and a half feet high, living on a small, warm world orbiting a slow burning star.
Although now technologically advanced, the kirrabilli evolved as environmental specialists who hunted for both animal and plant food across the extensive moss-like forest floors of their subtropical home. This soft sponge-like substrate played a key role in the evolution of the kirrabilli and their unusual needle like feet: The thin tips, unable to support themselves on the moss, sink into it several inches and are stopped from slipping deeper by a ring of tough, fibrous hairs. This provides some extra traction, but more importantly allows the thin and highly sensitive tips to detect vibrations passing through the denser ground beneath. By sensing the substrate in this way the kirrabilli can detect large creatures moving a considerable distance away while also communicating with one another via rhythmic vibrations through the ground.  As their evolution progressed towards more complex intelligence, entire long range conversations could be carried on this way and thus the groundwork was laid for co-operative hunting and intertribal communication.
Whilst their stable environment made thermoregulation largely unnecessary, the kirrabilli are able to maintain an elevated body temperature when necessary by concentrating warm blood near the central organs and withdrawing it from the long slender limbs. Weather falling outside of their range of tolerance was met by moss matt shelters and communal huddling until the discovery of fire and limited clothing.
Sensory input comes from several highly specialised organs and is dominated by sight. Two stalked and densely packed compound eyes extend from the front of the head, below which hang sensitive olfactory organs to detect scents and changes in humidity. In keeping with their well-developed vibration detection abilities, their hearing is acute and is mediated through mobile ears at the tip of the abdomen.
As omnivores, the kirrabilli possess mouthparts and manipulators of a generalised and adaptable design. The arms, derived from the lips, lack a solid skeleton and collect fruits or carry weapons for subduing small prey. Equipped with their own basic sense of taste, these arms pass food up the mouth that lies between them.
Their most critical adaptation, however, may be their linguistic abilities which encompass visual, aural and infrasonic components. Various configurations of the limbs and body reveal the colourful blue patches on the legs and abdomen, the different combinations conveying meaning and intent. Sound is generated through a combination of stridulation using the rough inner surfaces of the arms, and air expelled and modulated through the twin breathing spiracles on either side of the abdomen. Dramatic punctuation and long range communication can be supplemented by beating on the substrate. 
Currently a technologically advanced and relatively peaceful people, the kirrabilli have developed sustainable high density agriculture and their population continues to grow.
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gdfalksen:

"Heavenly Bodies - Cult Treasures and Spectacular Saints from the Catacombs” by Paul Koudounaris
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"No se preocupe señor turista, no se está quemando la Sebastiana. El muelle Prat está protegido, al igual que los cafes-butiques del Cerro Alegre. Los bares del puerto y los pubs de Cuming siguen atendiendo, fabricando ebrios en la ciudad con mayor tasa de alcoholismo en Chile. Los fuegos artificiales se verán igual este año, porque los lindos miradores siguen en su sitio. El muelle Barón está lejos del fuego, así que el proyecto mall sigue en pie. Si incluso las casitas de colores se han salvado, las que arden hoy son las de color gris, esas que no salen en las postales. Los que corren hoy, son los que siempre han corrido,corren todos los días pa’ tomar la micro, corren porque no tienen ascensor en su cerro, corren para llegar temprano al Van Buren y alcanzar un número. Los que corren hoy, con poquitas cosas, son los que menos cosas tenían para perder. No se preocupe señor turista, el incendio está lejos del Grand Hotel Gervasoni, hoy se quema el conventillo de la peruana, las casas que brotaron como callampas en los cerros. Arden los barrios que no salen en su mapa, porque en él todo acaba en la Av. Alemania. Tengo que decirlo: me indigna verlo preguntando por los ascensores. No entiendo que se alegre por la plaza victoria indemne, cuando ya son doce personas las que han muerto calcinadas. No entiendo que pregunte por la casa de Neruda, si a él ya no le sirve, pero a quinientas familias la suya sí. Usted tiene otros 38 cerros que visitar el próximo verano, pero ahora son diez mil los evacuados que no tienen dónde ir. De qué nos sirve el patrimonio si no hay humanidad."